Wednesday, July 29, 2009

When your doctor is on vacation . . .

. . .and you have a problem, unfortunately what you are often told to do is "go to the emergency room". At least that's what happened to us. Seven hours later, we left the emergency room (at nearly midnight) with unresolved issues and instructions to go to the office of the doctor filling in for our regular. Well, you can just imagine how that went. We were there for three hours, filled out every paper imaginable since they didn't know my husband from Adam, and finally got the type of examination and care we expected to be able to get in the emergency room of our large local hospital. Not all the answers yet, but some "This is not the problem" answers which are a bit of a relief. Now we have to go for tests tomorrow afternoon, and who knows how long that will take.

The ridiculous thing is, if our doctor or her office had told us "Dr. X is filling in for me, call him if you have a problem", we could have probably seen him yesterday afternoon before his office closed, and avoided all this. Why they didn't tell us is a mystery, since it was arranged for Dr. X to take care of emergencies with her patients.

2 comments:

Suzan said...

And some folks don't want to fix our health care system. Go figure. So your insurance company will pay for an ER visit and a doctor's visit. Your primary care physician doesn't worry about the extra costs incurred by not telling you there was a replacement doctor. Your doctor knows you have insurance and they will pay. That's only one small part of what is wrong with the system and what continues to drive up costs.

Kathryn said...

I have to say this sounds well organised compared to British health care! Unless you are admitted to hospital as an emergency (say as a road accident) tests such as MRIs and CT scans usually involve waiting for weeks. So sorry to hear this news though and hope the test results give you news you want to hear.